“Too Hot Salad” from “A Modern Way to Cook”

IMG_7302Looking at this picture reminds me again why I loved this salad: Isn’t just a gorgeous collection of colourful virtuousness?

It also was delicious.

A London summer is a mixed blessing of weather at best, and this summer is no different. But over the past weekend, we had a very hot day on Sunday, which begged for the “Too Hot Salad” to be made. Anna Jones said she makes it when it’s too hot to cook, and this was one of those days. (Indeed it was too hot to cook in the kitchen, but perfect weather for a barbeque in the garden, which is what we did.)

The Vietnamese influence is easy to taste: cold, fresh vegetables (especially carrots) coupled with a sweet soy sauce dressing. The leaves of coriander gave it a very nice kick. I was dubious about the inclusion of watermelon, but it worked. It’s also an excellent vegan recipe, which is always a good thing.

To be sure, making those beautiful vegetable ribbons takes some time. I wish I could be as quick as the estimate to make this (it took about double the time), but I do think it looks lovely, so perhaps the extra time was worth it. I’m also getting better at making vegetable ribbons, so perhaps that will come up in a job interview sometime and I can impress them with my unusual talent.

Would I make this again? I would indeed. And I might even do it on a day that’s not hot.

 

“Too Hot Salad” from “A Modern Way to Cook”

Plenty of Ottolenghi food: a Friday Feast

Anna: We decided that we wanted to do a proper blow-out feast, after the many abortive midweek Ottolenghi meals that we’ve cooked.

Kirstin: We wanted to give it a full crack of the whip!

Anna: Luckily neither of us was working this afternoon, because it was potentially going to be a massive faff.

Tom: But was it?

Anna: If either of us had been doing it on our own, yes. With the two of us it was still a faff.

Zoe: But was it an enjoyable faff?

Kirstin: Yes, we watched wartime documentaries in between, while things were in the oven.

Anna: And we sang along to the Brandenberg double-violin concerto as we peeled five heads of garlic, clove by clove. Between the two of us it took 40 minutes. The two most annoying things were the cloves of garlic and the bloody cardamom pods.

Kirstin: But you have such good wrist action, Anna! (Zoe guffaws)

Anna: How do you know about my wrist action? It’s all those years of violin playing! With the cardamom pods I had to get Kirstin to open the window. Two tablespoons of cardamom pods, and you had to bash them all up, and take all the seeds out of all the pods! It was about 40 pods! It was like, Christ, take me now. I bashed my head with the pestle. Or was it the mortar? Anyway, we cooked the “Watermelon and feta” to start. I’m going to compare it against the Nigella recipe. Her recipe is watermelon, feta and black olive. She has olives, lime juice, mint and flat-leaf parsley, rather than basil. But everything else is the same. So we cooked that, and then “Caramelized Garlic Tart”.

Kirstin: We called it Vampire Pie.

Anna: And then “Roasted Butternut Squash with Sweet Spices, Lime and Green Chilli”. Continue reading “Plenty of Ottolenghi food: a Friday Feast”

Plenty of Ottolenghi food: a Friday Feast