“Pretzel Peanut Butter Pie” from “Flavour: Eat What You Love”

I have to admit that when I stumbled across this recipe when browsing through the book, my very first thought was, “Colour me intrigued!” My second thought was, “When can I make this?”

In the introduction, Ruby said her inspiration for this came from the Candy Bar Pie at Momofuku in New York. Maybe that’s why I felt an immediate need to try this out: it spoke to me in a very deep way because of my American roots.

A flavour combination like this can only go one of two ways: wonderfully or horribly. There is no middle ground when it comes to this sort of combination. But given that this entire family is a fan of the peanut butter and chocolate combination– again, I blame the American in our DNA– I figured we had nothing to lose if we threw in some pretzels, too.

I am thrilled to report that this was wonderful.

But Pretzel Peanut Butter Pie isn’t going to work if you don’t like chocolate and peanut butter together, or indeed chocolate covered pretzels, or even the sometimes odd sweet-salty pairings that are available. (When Googling that exact phrase, I found something called a “Doughnut Burger,” which literally made me shudder. But on the same list from Buzzfeed, I found a listing for Chocolate Covered Bacon and I thought, “Yup. I’d try that.”)

I think the true test of any baked good is how long the leftovers last sitting around the kitchen. With two hungry teenage boys in the house, good things don’t last long. This pie, for example, was gone within 24 hours.

That tells you everything you need to know.

If you’re brave enough and are a fan of peanut butter and chocolate– with pretzels thrown in for good measure– click through this paragraph to find the recipe from The Guardian. 

“Pretzel Peanut Butter Pie” from “Flavour: Eat What You Love”

“Root Vegetable Pies” from “Plenty More”

IMG_6508Beautiful pie, right? I like to think so. It tastes even better than it looks.

The problem is I can’t look at this picture without thinking about the THREE HOURS, that’s right THREE HOURS [and yes, I am shouting] that it took to make them from start to finish.

In those three hours, I could have made six 30 minute meals from Jamie. I kid. Anyone who’s read this blog knows that we completed none of the 30 minute meals in 30 minutes, let alone cleaned up from them, so that’s an exaggeration. But still. Three hours is a long time to prepare one dish. I’ve done a three-course meal for eight people in less time than that.

I’m not sure what my problem was, or if that’s just how long it takes to make a decent pie. It’s a good thing I had set aside some time to make them, though as it was we didn’t sit down for dinner until 8 p.m.

I started at 5 p.m. to make the pastry, which was easy enough as you do it in the food processor. To be fair, I did get a call that took 15 minutes at 5.45 p.m. while I was chopping up the vegetables, so that set me back a bit. But it takes time to peel and chop (in uniform sizes no less) all of these root vegetables. It also took time to roll out and then cut the pie pastry (not to mention finding a pot top that was 14 cm in diameter, and another that was 8 cm in diameter.)

Don’t get me wrong. The pies were delicious. Good meals take time, attention and love. It’s just the next time I hope it’s quicker.

Believe it or not, and frankly I think this is a miracle, Ottolenghi made these very pies in an 8 minute segment on This Morning on ITV. He says it’s perfect for “Monday night cooking,” which I would agree, provided you have three hours to do it. To be fair, he had all the chopping and making done ahead of time. Television magic and all that. But he’s still incredibly charming, so you should watch for that.  You can either watch the clip, or read the recipe, which is also provided on the website. Click through to see it.

 

“Root Vegetable Pies” from “Plenty More”

“Chicken and Ham Pie” from “Rachel’s Everyday Kitchen”

Peter: Still no photo.

Anna: I’ve explained that.

Peter: It looks like a pie again. In fact, it looks like the fish pie from last week.

Anna: That will be the mashed potato on top. Your mum made this with the leftover roast chicken, as Rachel suggests. I like the fact she added in the leftover carrots from the meal too.

Peter: You know I like a good pie. This pie is no exception.

Anna: I have had some of the leftovers and it’s really quite yummy. Must be the double cream!

Peter: Did Louis have any for lunch today?

Anna: He did, and he loved it! Like father, like son. Pie.

“Chicken and Ham Pie” from “Rachel’s Everyday Kitchen”

“Beef Pie” from “Easy Meals”

Want to make this yourself? The recipe can be found on MummyPages Ireland here.

Andrew (12): Yum! This is nice!

Maureen (having not tasted it yet): Are you sure you’re my son? This is nothing but beef stew with a pastry lid on top, and you know that beef stew is one of the few foods that I don’t like at all.

Tim: See? Andrew likes it. It’s just like a Goddard’s Pie, which we love. Yum. This is nothing but win.

Maureen (now having had some): Wow. This is surprisingly nice. It’s still just beef stew with a pastry lid, but it is very good.

Continue reading ““Beef Pie” from “Easy Meals””

“Beef Pie” from “Easy Meals”

“Spicy Lamb Pie” and “Best-Ever Mash” from “The River Cottage Family Cookbook”

Maureen: What do you think of the pie? I have to say, using the offcuts to make stars that decorate the top look really nice.

Andrew (12): This is good. I would definitely have it again.

Nicholas (8): Yum. I like the crust better than the lamb, but it’s all good.

Maureen: It must have been so good because they made the lamb mince just for us at Dring’s.

Tim: This is good. It tastes like Nigella’s Keema in a pie.

Maureen: You’re right, it does. All I’d need to do is add some frozen peas, and we’d be there.

Continue reading ““Spicy Lamb Pie” and “Best-Ever Mash” from “The River Cottage Family Cookbook””

“Spicy Lamb Pie” and “Best-Ever Mash” from “The River Cottage Family Cookbook”

“Turkey and Ham Pie” from “Feast”

Tim: Well look at Andrew. There’s one empty bowl already.

Andrew (12): Yes, this is very good.

Nicholas (8): I think this is just a rip-off of chicken pot pie.

Tim: No, it’s not. It’s different. The chicken pot pie we usually have has leeks and peas. This one has turkey, ham and sweetcorn.

Maureen: Do you like it? Do you want me to make it again?

Tim: Well, that would mean you have to make turkey again, and you know how I feel about turkey (Editor’s Note: He hates it). But if you’re going to use up the leftover Thanksgiving turkey, this is nice.

Andrew: I think chicken pot pie is better.

Maureen: Why?

Andrew: Because it has chicken, rather than turkey.

Maureen: You’re all insane. You can’t really taste the difference between chicken and turkey when it’s swimming in double cream and butter. I think this is a delicious way to use up leftover turkey. It was easy enough to do on a weeknight, since Nigella does all of her pastry in a food processor, and I thought it was really good.

“Turkey and Ham Pie” from “Feast”

“Early Autumn Cornish Pasties” from “Jamie’s Great Britain”

Andrew (12): I like this very much. I can’t fault it in any way.

Tim: How does it compare to Goddard’s Pies? (Editor’s Note: We faithfully buy Goddard’s Pies every weekend for lunch at Greenwich Market. We especially love the cheese and onion. Not a Cornish pasty, but delicious just the same.)

Andrew: Goddard’s Pies are very good, but these are also very good.

Nicholas (8): Goddard’s Pies are better.

Andrew: You’re digging your own grave!

Tim: It’s Halloween! He’s getting into the spirit of things by digging his own grave!

Maureen: I like it a lot more than I thought I would. I wasn’t sure about baking the skirt steak– I didn’t think it would cook completely– but it worked.

Continue reading ““Early Autumn Cornish Pasties” from “Jamie’s Great Britain””

“Early Autumn Cornish Pasties” from “Jamie’s Great Britain”