“Mothership Sunday Roast Chicken” from “Save With Jamie”

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMaureen: Sunday lunch starring roast chicken! My favourite!

Nicholas (10): I love roast chicken. I bagsy* one of the legs. (For those readers among us who are unfamiliar with this fantastic British word, it means “claim”.)

Tim: I get the other one.

Maureen: Fair enough. What does everyone think?

Andrew: I’m not sure about the carrots.

Maureen: When you say, “not sure,” do you really mean, “I don’t like.”

Andrew (14): Well, no. Before I wasn’t sure. But now that I’ve had a few bites, I now know I mean I don’t like them.

Nicholas: I don’t like them either, and you know how much I like carrots.

Maureen: What don’t you like about them. Is it all the orange zest?

Nicholas: I guess so. I just prefer the other type you always make.

Maureen: OK. I’ll go back to the usual way the next time. I’ve been making that version, with carrots and honey, for years. That’s a Jamie recipe too. (Important note: I spent a good amount of time following this Sunday lunch trying to find exactly what Jamie book our beloved carrot recipe  is from, but to no avail. So I’m pretty sure it’s a Jamie recipe, but now I have to proof to back it up. This is the problem with having more than 150 cookbooks. Things can get muddled over time.)

Tim: The chicken is good, but I can’t see how it’s much different from any other roast chicken we’ve had over the years.

Maureen: I think the ability to be creative with a roast chicken recipe is somewhat limited. This version is fine and it works. The good thing about it, particularly for less confident cooks, is it includes directions on all the side vegetables to have with it. That’s a nice touch.

Nicholas: Other than the carrots, which we already decided we didn’t like.

Maureen: Fair enough. (Looking at the nearly empty serving platter). There’s one problem with this recipe though: We’re supposed to get two meals out of it.

Tim: Ha! Well, we do have a teenage boy at the table, and we are greedy when it comes to roast chicken, so maybe that’s the difference.

Cook’s Notes: Once I followed Jamie’s instructions to the letter, I realised that amendments were going to have to be made, otherwise we were going to end up having a variation of brown water on top of our chicken. So after I added just plain water, and tasted the flavourless “gravy,” I added the necessary amount of chicken stock cubes. So if you do make this, don’t add 600 ml of boiling water, add 600ml of chicken stock. You can thank me later.)

 

“Mothership Sunday Roast Chicken” from “Save With Jamie”

“Green Slaw” from “The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMy making this green slaw is directly related to the new addition in our kitchen. During our stop in Reims on the way back home from our French holiday, we stumbled upon a Galeries Lafayette– an utterly fantastic French department store. As we always do when we are in a foreign country, we stopped in the housewares department to see what treasures we could find.

Tim spent a good amount of time admiring the pressure cookers. I don’t have to tell you that the French take both their food and the equipment to make it seriously. He was very keen to take one home with us. In what may be a first for our relationship, I found myself resisting his pitch to get another kitchen gadget.

As I explained to him, I think my lack of enthusiasm to acquire a pressure cooker had to do with the fact that I grew up with one — my mother used hers several times a week– and it was drilled into me how dangerous they could be if they exploded. But in the end, I abandoned my resistance to the acquire the pressure cooker. (I’m so glad I did but that’s a story for another day).

So I made this green slaw for our inaugural cooking in the pressure cooker. As we were making pulled pork, we thought the green slaw would be perfect with it. And it was. It’s delicious. It’s a perfect side dish for a barbeque, or if you need a sprightly salad. The fact that it wasn’t laden with mayonnaise was a bonus. We loved it, and enjoyed seconds the next day very much.

A note about preparation: your food processor is your friend. There’s a lot of chopping in this, but if you just use the slicer in your food processor, it will only take you minutes to get it all prepared.

Both the green slaw, and the acquisition of a pressure cooker, are highly recommended.

“Green Slaw” from “The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook”